Pinned Posts

Reverse Engineering: No Place Like Home

Title No Place Like Home – reimagination of objects from traditional shoe-making industry Field of Study In this project, I plan to start from the everyday objects in the traditional industry – shoes, give the imagination from literature or culture and explore the potential relationships between users and things. Through the interaction with our prototype, I hope to bring a reflection on reconnecting people to the craftsmanship inherent in shoe-making, and also stretch the boundaries of possibility for the industry. Context It is the commission from Global Footprint project in Northamptonshire, the county which was famous for the shoes-making traditional industry. More

Dioramas – Hiroshi Sugimoto

“Dioramas” is the first photo project of Japanese photography Hiroshi Sugimoto. In American Natural History Museum, Sugimoto captures his scenes with a large format camera, long exposures time and adjustment of light to present his idealistic vision of nature. His photos brought these dioramas to live, “However fake the subject, once photographed, it’s as good as real.” Sugimoto said. In this moment, the boundary between fake and real get blur. Back to Natural History Museum, to make these three-dimensions dioramas, researchers and photographers are sent to the spots, collected lot amounts of specimens, photos and data from nature, then created the illusion of reality. Sugimoto’s re-photographing… More

Making Nature

When I was a child, I was really obsessed with a series of animal specimens exhibited the zoo of our city and visited that again and again. The stuffed specimens were positioned in front of the elaborately painted backdrops with the artificial plant, displaying animals in their natural surroundings. My favourite one was a group of wandering wild yak. Every time when I stared at it, I felt crossing the limitation of time and space, and the diorama brought me to the imaginary Tibetan Plateau that I had never seen. Probably we could view diorama as the work result of making nature. Human order everything according to the classified labels… More

Interview of Kawaii Gazette

Kawaii Gazette is an over 10 years blog managed by two lovely Italian girls written in both Italian and English. What they discuss about is not only the general stereotype(such as Hello Kitty, shiny pink stuff or Lolita style) but the kawaii elements on really wide aspects. The blog shares kawaii information of lifestyle, commodities, Japanese origin characters, handmade craft and even consumer electronics. I emailed them for the interview to understand more about European kawaii lovers perspective, then they replied me kindly and promised to help me with a written survey. Q1. Would you please… More

Go further from kawaii…

Nowadays, since the consumer market of kawaii lovers has strong potential, lots of technology products are designed with cartoon characters or pastel colours. The innocent smile face or fancy patterns might be the best decoration to melt the coldness of consumers electronics, on the opposite, can we turn the role of technology helping to decorate the kawaii culture? In the near future, the cute character in the the virtual world might be created to interact with us, applying technical skill on kawaii accessories and costumes would bring the diversity of colours and textile. Combining with technolegy knowledge and the characteristic of kawaii, the possibility of kawaii will… More

Visiting ARTBOX

ARTBOX is a shop located in Shelton Street, London which sells kawaii character houseware and stationery from Japan and Korea, such as Rilakkuma, Moomin, Monchhichi, Gudetama, Sumikko Gurashi, Domo Kun, Hello Kitty, Mamegoma, Snoopy, My Melody and many. Today, I visited there to observe the customers and merchandises, and had a short conversation to the stuff. Q: How long have you started the brand? A: About 8 years. In the beginning, the product was mainly from Korea, but now we focus on Japanese characters. Q: The style of your brand focus a lot on cute Japanese characters and really closer to Asian… More

Daily life kawaii

Japanese characters such as Hello Kitty, Pokemon, and Sailermoon is one of the most important components in the rise of kawaii culture. The consumer goods with kawaii characters which were created and developed originally in Japan diffused largely and acculturated culture in foreign countries. For myself, it hard to find kawaii fashion elements in my closet, but the products of Japanese character exist in my life everywhere. I have a black cat doll from the animation Kiki’s Delivery in front of my window, the capsule toy of Piske and Usagi by Kanahei on my desk, and the Rilakkuma cable tidy clip for my… More

Kawaii in London

To meet the kawaii lover tribe in London, I search some related events and blogs. Below are the hosts and bloggers I have tried to join or contact so far. [HYPER Kawaii] As part of HYPER JAPAN Festival, the biggest Japanese culture event in London, HYPER Kawaii provides live stage performances, Harajuku fashion catwalk and kawaii merchandise booths, which offers a wide selection of clothes, makeup, wigs, and accessories either from Japan or from local UK designers inspired by Japanese aesthetics. Last August, it collaborated with the art project DOMO TIME CAPSULE and let HYPER Kawaii participant join the activity as well. I tried to contact… More

Kawaii International

Kawaii culture is not only popular in Japan. The influence grows quickly all around the world, more and more Westerners obsessed with kawaii fashion and decoration. The Japanese state television NHK produced a series of programs “Kawaii International” to discuss the essence of kawaii culture, introducing kawaii evolution and trend in many different aspects. In this episode, two mainly sections are introduced to the audience. [ The Evolution of Kawaii ]  It gives a detailed narrative of kawaii costume style definitions and histories originate in Harajuku. No matter what kind of kawaii style you belonged to, according to Harajuku fashion statement, “There are no sets of rules for the kawaii fashion. More

Definition of Kawaii culture and Lolita style

In modern Japanese, the word “kawaii” means “cute,” “adorable,” or “loveable,” and is associated with a huge variety of ideas and objects. Some Japanese sociologists have even suggested that “kawaii” can be used to represent pretty much everything that is acceptable and desirable in Japan. The following paragraph quoted from this article goes deep into the narrative of kawaii culture. “To explain the Japanese adjective “kawaii”, “cute” is not a perfect translation but gives some idea of what it is about. The term emerged in the 1970s, at a time of economic prosperity in Japan when consumer goods… More

Recent Posts

Reverse Engineering: No Place Like Home

Title No Place Like Home – reimagination of objects from traditional shoe-making industry Field of Study In this project, I plan to start from the everyday objects in the traditional industry – shoes, give the imagination from literature or culture and explore the potential relationships between users and things. Through the interaction with our prototype, I hope to bring a reflection on reconnecting people to the craftsmanship inherent in shoe-making, and also stretch the boundaries of possibility for the industry. Context It is the commission from Global Footprint project in Northamptonshire, the county which was famous for the shoes-making traditional industry. More

Dioramas – Hiroshi Sugimoto

“Dioramas” is the first photo project of Japanese photography Hiroshi Sugimoto. In American Natural History Museum, Sugimoto captures his scenes with a large format camera, long exposures time and adjustment of light to present his idealistic vision of nature. His photos brought these dioramas to live, “However fake the subject, once photographed, it’s as good as real.” Sugimoto said. In this moment, the boundary between fake and real get blur. Back to Natural History Museum, to make these three-dimensions dioramas, researchers and photographers are sent to the spots, collected lot amounts of specimens, photos and data from nature, then created the illusion of reality. Sugimoto’s re-photographing… More

Making Nature

When I was a child, I was really obsessed with a series of animal specimens exhibited the zoo of our city and visited that again and again. The stuffed specimens were positioned in front of the elaborately painted backdrops with the artificial plant, displaying animals in their natural surroundings. My favourite one was a group of wandering wild yak. Every time when I stared at it, I felt crossing the limitation of time and space, and the diorama brought me to the imaginary Tibetan Plateau that I had never seen. Probably we could view diorama as the work result of making nature. Human order everything according to the classified labels… More

Interview of Kawaii Gazette

Kawaii Gazette is an over 10 years blog managed by two lovely Italian girls written in both Italian and English. What they discuss about is not only the general stereotype(such as Hello Kitty, shiny pink stuff or Lolita style) but the kawaii elements on really wide aspects. The blog shares kawaii information of lifestyle, commodities, Japanese origin characters, handmade craft and even consumer electronics. I emailed them for the interview to understand more about European kawaii lovers perspective, then they replied me kindly and promised to help me with a written survey. Q1. Would you please… More

Go further from kawaii…

Nowadays, since the consumer market of kawaii lovers has strong potential, lots of technology products are designed with cartoon characters or pastel colours. The innocent smile face or fancy patterns might be the best decoration to melt the coldness of consumers electronics, on the opposite, can we turn the role of technology helping to decorate the kawaii culture? In the near future, the cute character in the the virtual world might be created to interact with us, applying technical skill on kawaii accessories and costumes would bring the diversity of colours and textile. Combining with technolegy knowledge and the characteristic of kawaii, the possibility of kawaii will… More

Visiting ARTBOX

ARTBOX is a shop located in Shelton Street, London which sells kawaii character houseware and stationery from Japan and Korea, such as Rilakkuma, Moomin, Monchhichi, Gudetama, Sumikko Gurashi, Domo Kun, Hello Kitty, Mamegoma, Snoopy, My Melody and many. Today, I visited there to observe the customers and merchandises, and had a short conversation to the stuff. Q: How long have you started the brand? A: About 8 years. In the beginning, the product was mainly from Korea, but now we focus on Japanese characters. Q: The style of your brand focus a lot on cute Japanese characters and really closer to Asian… More

Daily life kawaii

Japanese characters such as Hello Kitty, Pokemon, and Sailermoon is one of the most important components in the rise of kawaii culture. The consumer goods with kawaii characters which were created and developed originally in Japan diffused largely and acculturated culture in foreign countries. For myself, it hard to find kawaii fashion elements in my closet, but the products of Japanese character exist in my life everywhere. I have a black cat doll from the animation Kiki’s Delivery in front of my window, the capsule toy of Piske and Usagi by Kanahei on my desk, and the Rilakkuma cable tidy clip for my… More

Kawaii in London

To meet the kawaii lover tribe in London, I search some related events and blogs. Below are the hosts and bloggers I have tried to join or contact so far. [HYPER Kawaii] As part of HYPER JAPAN Festival, the biggest Japanese culture event in London, HYPER Kawaii provides live stage performances, Harajuku fashion catwalk and kawaii merchandise booths, which offers a wide selection of clothes, makeup, wigs, and accessories either from Japan or from local UK designers inspired by Japanese aesthetics. Last August, it collaborated with the art project DOMO TIME CAPSULE and let HYPER Kawaii participant join the activity as well. I tried to contact… More

Kawaii International

Kawaii culture is not only popular in Japan. The influence grows quickly all around the world, more and more Westerners obsessed with kawaii fashion and decoration. The Japanese state television NHK produced a series of programs “Kawaii International” to discuss the essence of kawaii culture, introducing kawaii evolution and trend in many different aspects. In this episode, two mainly sections are introduced to the audience. [ The Evolution of Kawaii ]  It gives a detailed narrative of kawaii costume style definitions and histories originate in Harajuku. No matter what kind of kawaii style you belonged to, according to Harajuku fashion statement, “There are no sets of rules for the kawaii fashion. More

Definition of Kawaii culture and Lolita style

In modern Japanese, the word “kawaii” means “cute,” “adorable,” or “loveable,” and is associated with a huge variety of ideas and objects. Some Japanese sociologists have even suggested that “kawaii” can be used to represent pretty much everything that is acceptable and desirable in Japan. The following paragraph quoted from this article goes deep into the narrative of kawaii culture. “To explain the Japanese adjective “kawaii”, “cute” is not a perfect translation but gives some idea of what it is about. The term emerged in the 1970s, at a time of economic prosperity in Japan when consumer goods… More